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Montana Film Office

Mar
31
2013
Press: March 2013

SXSW Review: All the Labor

16 March 2013 11:00 AM, PDT | Slackerwood

With ten albums over almost 20 years, the Austin band The Gourds has been well established on the local scene with their raucous live performances. Kevin Russell formed the band in 1994 with fellow songwriter Jimmy Smith, and Claude Bernard on accordion, guitar and keyboards — Keith Langford later joined the band on drums. It was the viral sensation of their cover of “Gin and Juice” that garnered them national attention, and has become their band’s version of “Freebird” as the most requested song. Longtime fans of the band know that the magic of The Gourds truly comes from the communal live experience, whether witnessed at a jam-packed Thursday night show at Shady Grove or the memorable SXSW 2005 free show at Auditorium Shores with a sea of over 20,000 people.

Director and editor Doug Hawes-Davis captures the beloved band in his documentary, All The Labor, which premiered last night at SXSW 2013.

– Debbie Cerda

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Shinyribs glisten at White Water Tavern

BY JACK W. HILL SPECIAL TO THE DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE

Thursday, February 28, 2013

LITTLE ROCK — Kevin Russell is a man of multiple musical identities. Best-known as a founding member of The Gourds, a popular Austin, Texas, band, Russell has a new group, Shinyribs.

Fans of Russell recall his first band of note, The Picket Line Coyotes, which played a time or two in the mid- 1980s at Juanita’s before falling apart in the early ’90s. Not to be deterred from his musical destiny, Russell formed The Gourds, who remain intact, he assures fans.

“The Gourds are still going,” Russell says. “But after 20 years of Gourds-ism, I felt like doing something else on occasion. So I branched out into this other thing, and now I’m bringing it to new places. It’s part of my regional expansion plan, into Arkansas and Oklahoma.”

Read the rest of the article here.

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Milkdrive, The Gourds

Press_3-13_ATLAustinChronicle_TheAustinChronicle

Courtesy of The Austin Chronicle

Fri., March 8, 9pm

Threadgill’s World HQ, 301 W. Riverside, 512/472-9304

http://www.threadgills.com

This will be the only appearance by Austin’s roots music maniacs during South by Southwest. Live, that is. You can catch ’em thrice on the big screen during SXSW Film, with noted documentary filmmaker Doug Hawes-Davis debuting All the Labor. An in-depth look at the band, it promises the usual archival footage and behind-the-scenes goofiness as well as exploring the camaraderie that allows them to remain one of our town’s longest-running and most-beloved acts.

– Jim Caligiuri

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SXSW Capsule: “All the Labor”

By Michael Corcoran | Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 10:20 AM

The Gourds are an acclaimed Austin group of five distinct individuals, and their hillbilly art rock attracts a curious cult audience (slacker parrotheads?). But the band’s backstory is really not that intriguing.

“Who wants to know anything about what we do? Who cares?” Gourds bassist Jimmy Smith says at the beginning of “All the Labor,” a documentary that delves music-deep into little Austin’s Greatest Band.

Directed by Montana’s Doug Hawes-Davis, whose previous film “Facing the Storm: The Story of the American Bison,” was also about a splendid species nearing extinction, ”Labor” touches on the key biographical points while understanding that nothing about the members is as interesting as its richly invigorating groove connection. What sets “Labor” apart from other music docs is that they aren’t making bands like the Gourds anymore.

Read the rest of the article here.

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Music Documentaries Spotlight Styles Underneath the Pop Music Radar

By Rob Patterson (/users/rob-patterson) | MARCH 11, 2013

The music isn’t just in the clubs, concert halls, outdoor stages and backyards this SXSW week. It’s also on the silver screen. Below are some music documentaries of note that delve into styles and sounds underneath the pop music radar. (Find a bigger list of music films on the SXSW “Music at the Movies” page.)

(http://sxsw.com/film/screenings/music-at-the-movies)

• “All The Labor”

(http://www.highplainsfilms.org/hpf/films/all_the_labor) – Making its world premiere is Doug Hawes-Davis’s inside look at Austin’s own The Gourds. The award-winning nature documentarian from the Big Sky country of Montana was inspired by his fandom for and friendship with the near-impossible-to-categorize roots music band to create this beautifully shot as well as intimate and insightful look at a group beloved by its cult following. And in the process reveal the unique and compelling charms of The Gourds and unlock why the group continues to play some 150 shows a year even if large-scale success remains elusive. Screenings: Wed. 3/13 at Topfer Theatre at Zach Scott, 7 p.m.; Thurs. 3/14 at SXSatellite: Alamo Village, 4:15 p.m.; Saturday 3/16 at Alamo Ritz 1, 4:30 p.m.

Read the rest of the article here.

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Concert Blogger Chats With Filmmaker Doug Hawes-Davis About New Gourds Music Documentary

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Photo by Joe Ryan

KATHY MCCONNELL MARCH 13, 2013 0

Great acts don’t always get the credit they deserve. All the Labor, the new documentary from High Plains Films, is a testament to exactly that. The film profiles The Gourds, an Austin-based band whose love for music and performing far exceeds the mediocre success they have hailed. Breaking the typical music documentary mold of an artist’s quick rise to fame and the destruction that then ensues, All the Labor presents the audience with the deeper discovery of a band’s genuine relationship with their music. Rather than capitalizing through their music, The Gourds live through their music and the audience won’t be able to leave this film without a sincere respect for that.

Read the rest of the article here.

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All the Labor

Press_3-13_ATLIndiewire_Indiewire

Courtesy of Indiewire

Director: Doug Hawes-Davis

Cast: Kevin RussellJimmy SmithClaude BernardMax JohnstonKeith Langford

Theatrical Release Date:

Festivals: South By Southwest Film Conference and Festival (SXSW)

Synopsis: Too happy-go-lucky for the earnest fans of roots music, too plaid and pragmatic for the hippies, too old and hairy for the mainstream, too young to be called legends. Sound like friends of yours? For nearly two decades, the Gourds have been the musical distillation of Austin itself: A label-defying, unpretentious, gregarious gang of friends whose primary motive is to have fun create great music together. “All the Labor” captures The Gourds’ enduring brotherhood and magnetic musicianship through candid conversations, raucous performances, on-tour media interviews and reflections and insight from friends and family. [Synopsis courtesy of SXSW]

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SxSW Film Report: 5 New Must-See Rock Movies

by Scott VonDoviak

Only the lucky and well-connected can gain access to the big-buzz shows at SXSW (such as this year’s midnight Prince showcase at La Zona Rosa), but anyone with a film pass can get up close and personal with favorite rockers via the magic of movies. Here are five picks to click from the 2013 SxSW Film Festival that may soon make their way to your local theater or instant viewing queue.

All the Labor

The Gourds have been rocking Austin with their rootsy brand of Americana for nearly two decades, but their only sniff at national fame came via an unlikely cover of Snoop Dogg’s “Gin and Juice,” which went viral in

the days before most of us knew what that meant outside of its medical context. Unfortunately, their Internet hit was generally credited to Phish in those outlaw Napster days, so The Gourds remain a below-the-radar success story. Doug Hawes-Davis’ rockumentary may change that, assuming it gets seen beyond its SXSW premiere. Following the band on the road and in the studio as they navigate the perilous waters of the modern music business, All the Labor is a treat for longtime fans, as well as a great introduction to the raucous altcountry jams and surreal folk anthems of the band’s principle creative forces, Kevin Russell and Jimmy Smith.

Read the full article here.

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SXSW Review: All The Labor

Press_3-13_ATLSlackerwood_Slackerwood

Courtesy of Slackerwood

By Debbie Cerda on March 16, 2013 – 1:00pm in Reviews SXSW

With ten albums over almost 20 years, the Austin band The Gourds has been well established on the local scene with their raucous live performances. Kevin Russell formed the band in 1994 with fellow songwriter Jimmy Smith, and Claude Bernard on accordion, guitar and keyboards — Keith Langford later joined the band on drums. It was the viral sensation of their cover of “Gin and Juice” that garnered them national attention, and has become their band’s version of “Freebird” as the most requested song. Longtime fans of the band know that the magic of The Gourds truly comes from the communal live experience, whether witnessed at a jam-packed Thursday night show at Shady Grove or the memorable SXSW 2005 free show at Auditorium Shores with a sea of over 20,000 people.

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Gourds on Film: All The Labor Documents Austin Band’s Rise and Thrall

Press_3-13_ATLTexasObserver_HighPlainsFilms.com

Courtesy of HighPlainsFilms.com

In the waning days of the 20th century, two things were considered gospel among in-the-know Austinites: Lance Armstrong, fresh off his first Tour de France victory in 1999, was the greatest athlete Texas had ever produced, and The Gourds were never, ever going to play “Gin & Juice” again. As it turns out, the case for Armstrong’s supremacy has been torpedoed by illicit juicing, and The Gourds have embraced the potentially tiresome novelty of “Gin & Juice” as the anchor—“Free Bird”-style—of mid-set medleys. Fans of both brands have learned it’s best never to say never.

Read the rest of the article here.