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Montana Film Office

Mar
1
2011
March 2011 – Press & News

treasureFilm crew scurries to finish snow shots

While some Flathead Valley residents were rejoicing at any recent sign of spring, filmmaker Andrew Wiest was hoping for an extension of winter. After about three weeks of intense shooting – launching into the project with 14 straight long days on set – the local director and crew are about to wrap up their shoot of “Treasure State,” a movie that Wiest, 32, says “showcases the Montana winter.”

“We had to make sure we had snow, and crammed big outdoor action set pieces into the first two weeks,” he said last week. “We’re mostly into interiors now, but do have a few traveling scenes where we need snow and mountains.”

The locally produced independent film features the story of two teenage boys, Levi Hogue and Trey Stanton, whose families are both dealing with financial blows. They set off separately on searches for valuable cargo from a plane that has crashed in the snow-covered wilderness of Montana, all the while fending off the villains who caused the accident. The twist is that the two come from feuding families and they must put aside their differences and work together if they are going to succeed and gain the offered reward. The film fills Wiest’s desires to make a family-friendly action picture featuring young people in peril, and a tribute to the Western landscape and lifestyle.

Click here for a PDF of the full article by Heidi Gaiser of the Daily Inter Lake. Photo by Nate Chute.


maps11Getting the shot: MAPS students produce documentary to air on PBS

Setting up with two cameras and a boom mic, Ian Marquand walked into the Westview Center over and over and over again. Some shots were soft on the focus. Other shots weren’t zoomed out far enough. Others were just shaky. But they wanted to get things just right. After all, what a group of MAPS Media Institute students were working on Wednesday after school will be broadcast across all of Montana.

The state will be getting a taste of what MAPS has to offer when its documentary – “After the Bell: Inside the MAPS Media Institute” – airs on PBS next month, hosted by Marquand, a MAPS instructor. The 26-minute program will air April 16 at 5 p.m., again the next day at 10:30 a.m. and a third time on May 27 at 11:30 a.m.

Cody Tredik, a junior at Hamilton High School, was helping out on Wednesday’s shoot.

“I’m what’s called a grip. I’m the extra hand on set that plugs stuff in, carries things around, that sort of stuff,” Tredik said.

This is Tredik’s first year with MAPS. He is currently taking the film class. He said he’s enjoyed his time working on “After the Bell.”

“It’s really fun and we’re going to see it on PBS, which is really cool,” Tredik said. “The payoff is getting to see it on TV.”

The idea of putting together a look into the after-school program has been in the works for a couple of years, according to executive director Peter Rosten.

“Finally, this year we felt comfortable doing it,” Rosten said. A close to half-hour documentary isn’t anything new for these students, Rosten said. They created a film for this year’s Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, as well as another documentary on smoking that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control picked up and ran nationally, Rosten said.

Click here for a PDF of the full article by Whitney Bermes of the Ravalli Republic. Photo by David Erickson. Click here for a PDF of another article by Whitney Bermes titled “MAPS program turns pro-bono work into class”.